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This Device is Changing Women’s Lives

If you are a male you have most likely already closed this page, but if you are still hear you have now been warned that this post may disturb you. This is obviously a subject that is of most interest to females in their child bearing years. The menstrual cup is a medical grade silicone cup that is inserted into the lower vagina to collect menstrual contents. The first cup was patented in the 1930’s and later cup designs were released in the 1960’s with no widespread commercial success.

Why try a menstrual cup:

Eco-friendly (no waste)

Cost effective (no need to continually purchase other feminine hygiene products)

Safer then tampons (lower risk of toxic shock syndrome)

Less worry (change less often and never run out of supplies)

Be certain to cleanse your cup after purchase by either boiling it or washing thoroughly with hot soap and water (I boiled mine). Follow the instructions included in the packaging to insert the cup into the lower vagina by folding the cup in half lengthwise and then in half again. This may take several attempts to position the cup where it is comfortable. I found that I was still able to detect that the cup was there with each way that I tried to position it. Unlike a tampon that I can not feel unless it is placed too low in the vagina, I was never able to get it where I could not feel it at all. However, it was not very noticeable or distracting to wear and I did not try to cut off the stem as suggested.

After trying to use the menstrual cup about 15 times, I found that it did not work for me. I have had two vaginal child births (my second baby was 9.5 pounds). I purchased the largest cup size available that is recommended for women who have had vaginal child births. After several attempts of repositioning the cup I was unable to successfully find a placement where I did not have leakage. Removing the cup was easy, but it was very messy. I was in the comfort of my own home when I first removed the cup and did get my hand dirty. I could not imagine trying this in a public restroom. I felt the need to wash the cup prior to reinsertion and this would have been very difficult if I was on the go. I was told that the cup is good for women that have a heavy flow because it can hold more then the typical tampon or pad. I was unable to test this since I never could stop leakage around the cup.

I have spoken with other women that swear by this device and say that it has changed the way they view their menstrual cycle. They say that it is much easier and less hassle then tampons or pads. I was encouraged to try the menstrual cup because of the environmental, monetary, and health benefits it provides, and I hope that you will give it a try as well. I am hoping that you will share your experience.